Xiaomi to sell smartphones in UK through Three

‘China’s Apple’ turns focus to west and is set to raise $10bn on Hong Kong stock exchangeThe Smartphone maker Xiaomi will begin selling its smartphones in the UK under a partnership with Hutchinson’s Three as “China’s Apple” turns its attention to the …

Read more

The Chinese are coming. Samsung is steady. Apple’s iPhone 7 has to impress

This week’s launch of Apple’s latest smartphone comes in an unfamilar period for the company – one of falling sales and declining revenues

Wireless-only headphones? Dual rear cameras? Pressure-sensitive sensors? This year, as every year, the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco will be crammed to the rafters with press and Apple well-wishers waiting for the pomp, circumstance and technical revelations of another iPhone launch. But this one, on Wednesday, is more important for Apple than it has been for a while.

After the huge success of 2014’s iPhone 6 – which introduced a completely new design with larger screen sizes, attracting more people switching from rival Android phones than ever before – 2015’s iPhone 6S has been a bit of a damp squib in terms of consumer buzz. And encroaching competition from China means Apple faces arguably the most competitive market conditions it has ever seen.

Continue reading…

Read more

Xiaomi, Vivo and Oppo: the challengers leading China’s charge against Apple

The US giant’s flat results are in part due to low-cost rivals thriving in the world’s biggest smartphone market

The idea that one of America’s most talismanic businesses – and the world’s biggest company by market value – might one day come to rely on China for its growth would have seemed strange just a decade ago. But for iPhone maker Apple, what happens on the other side of the world is suddenly crucial to its future.

Speaking to analysts last week as the company released its fourth-quarter earnings, chief executive Tim Cook couldn’t assuage concerns. While proclaiming the “best results ever” in greater China, with revenues up 14% to more than $18bn, he also admitted that “we began to see some signs of economic softness [there] earlier this month, most notably in Hong Kong.” The shares, already down from $130 last May to $100, clattered down another few dollars.

Continue reading…

Read more