London Stock Exchange refuses to remove palm oil firm from green index

The FTSE4Good indices are under fire from environmental campaigners for the inclusion of Golden-Agri ResourcesThe London Stock Exchange Group has refused to remove a major palm oil company from an influential investment index of environmentally friendl…

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Restaurants could make £7 for every £1 invested in cutting waste, report reveals

Global study sets out how industry could make waste reduction pay, using data taken from across 12 countriesRestaurants can make a profit of £7 for every £1 they invest in cutting food waste, a global report reveals today, in findings that are hailed a…

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UK ban on discarding edible fish at sea thwarted by industry

Fishermen not implementing the ban and government failing to act, House of Lords saysPublic backing for a ban on discarding edible fish at sea has been thwarted by the reluctance of the fishing industry and the government to put an end to the wasteful …

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World’s top fishing nations to be given millions to protect oceans

Bloomberg Philanthropies to launch major grant for coastal communities to improve the health of oceansMillions of pounds’ worth of funding to tackle global overfishing and protect coral reefs will be announced at a major conference in Indonesia this we…

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Feeling green: the brands bringing social consciousness into fashion

A group of established and emerging brands are pushing the boundaries on the British high street and beyond to create timeless pieces with accessible prices

Eco-Age founder Livia Firth and entrepreneur Miroslava Duma were on hand this week in London to celebrate Bottletop – a fashion brand that has built a business out of making luxury handbags from waste drinks cans – now opening its first flagship store on London’s Regent Street. Bottletop is unusual, not because it makes bags out of other people’s rubbish, or that the geek-meets-chic store will have the first zero-waste interior to be 3D printed from recycled plastic complete with a resident robot making customised bag charms and key rings while you wait – although that does clock up several USPs. No, Bottletop is unusual in that it does not put its profit margins first.

The brand was started in 2002 by friends Cameron Saul, 35 and Oliver Wayman, 33, as a charitable collaboration with Mulberry (the luxury fashion house that Saul’s father, Roger, founded). The first bag was made from ring pulls and leather off-cuts in Kenya, and was sold to create employment and improve lives in under-developed communities. Their atelier is now in Salvador, where ring pulls are hand-crocheted on to certified zero-Amazon-deforestation leather and they continue to produce an art-on-canvas collection in Kenya. It feeds 20% of profits back into the Bottletop Foundation to fund health and education projects in Salvador, Rio de Janeiro, Nairobi and Ethiopia, which has amounted to around £1m so far.

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Grand Designs’ Kevin McCloud seeks to raise £50m to build 600 homes a year

Channel 4 presenter set to issue bond for private investors with aim of building ‘beautiful and sustainable’ houses

Grand Designs presenter Kevin McCloud is seeking to raise up to £50m to build about 600 “beautiful and sustainable” houses a year in a challenge to the soulless, identikit estates built by conventional developers.

McCloud’s firm, HAB (Happiness, Architecture, Beauty) is hoping to raise the money through a bond for private investors, promising a return of 4.8% a year over a five-year period.

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Ocean conservation needs a Hippocratic oath – we must do no harm

Saving the oceans shouldn’t mean hurting people. Should marine conservation have its own code of conduct?

Many professions – including doctors, lawyers and teachers – have a code of conduct to ensure fair practice and accountability. For example, doctors have a Hippocratic oath. Perhaps marine conservation should have one too?

As marine conservation ramps up around the globe to achieve UN sustainable development goal (SDG) 14 – conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources – there is a risk that some actions taken that will undermine the rights and needs of local people. Past conservation efforts have led to the displacement and marine protected areas have been called a form of “ocean grabbing”.

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¿Por qué la obsesión de Latinoamérica por las represas?

Son símbolos de orgullo nacional, pero dado el aumento en las protestas y los costos medioambientales ahora se cuestiona el futuro de las mega represas

Durante abril de 2014, las lluvias fueron monumentales. Para principios de mayo, los operadores de la represa de 219 MW Cachoeira Caldeirão, que estaba construyéndose en el remoto estado de Amapá en Brasil, sabían que los niveles del río Araguari se encontraban peligrosamente altos. Si no se retiraba algo de agua de inmediato, la represa entera podría colapsarse. No habría ningún peligro para la población porque toda la escorrentía sería absorbida por otras dos represas río abajo, pensaba la compañía de energía hidráulica.

Las comunicaciones fallaron y nadie advirtió al pequeño pueblo de Ferreira Gomes, situado en las orillas del Araguari a casi 50km de distancia.

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‘International development’ is a loaded term. It’s time for a rethink | Jennifer Lentfer

Our organisation was formed 30 years ago to share ideas on making the poor richer. Now a new mindset has led the organisation to change its name

People would always give me a quizzical look. “And what is that, exactly?” they would ask, if brave enough to reveal their naiveté about what was to become the next decades of my life.

“Well, it’s the study of how to help poor countries become richer,” I would explain of my choice to study international development.

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