Facebook labelled ‘digital gangsters’ by report on fake news

Company broke privacy and competition law and should be regulated urgently, say MPsFacebook deliberately broke privacy and competition law and should urgently be subject to statutory regulation, according to a devastating parliamentary report denouncin…

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Why Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s ‘adult in the room’, may pay the price for its failings

After months of revelations about the firm, the executive is being talked of as a sacrifice, not founder Mark ZuckerbergFacebook’s already terrible year is ending on a new low, as Mark Zuckerberg and his beleaguered executive team battle another share …

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How News Corp-owned agency monitors journalists’ social media use – video explainer

News Corp-owned social media agency Storyful has come under scrutiny over a plugin that monitors content journalists are looking at on social media. The tool, called Verify, is a system for checking the authenticity of videos posted on social media pla…

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How Facebook got into a mess – and why it can’t get out of it

Mark Zuckerberg will be hauled before Congress this week. He’ll apologise – but his company doesn’t know how to change its brand of ‘surveillance capitalism’Ponder this … and weep. The United States, theoretically a mature democracy of 327 million soul…

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Gordon Brown: delay Murdoch Sky takeover till after Leveson part 2

Former PM says planned second part of inquiry is needed to look at evidence of wrongdoing beyond phone hacking

Gordon Brown has demanded that Rupert Murdoch’s takeover of the Sky satellite business be delayed until the government carries out the second part of the Leveson inquiry into press malpractice.

In a letter to the culture secretary, Karen Bradley, the former prime minister said the bid by Murdoch-controlled 21st Century Fox for Sky made the “promised but delayed second part of the Leveson inquiry … particularly relevant and timely”.

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‘Surveillance is never a solution’: readers’ thoughts on kids, tech and privacy

As our series on child rights and tech comes to an end, we look back at readers’ thoughts on the topic

As we come to the end of our series on child rights and technology, we take a look at some of the main themes that have emerged and our readers’ thoughts on them. The full series can be found here.

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Could children one day sue parents for posting baby pics on Facebook?

Pictures once kept hidden in family photo albums are now being shared with the world, and children may not appreciate it in the future

That photo of your toddler running around in a nappy or having a temper tantrum? Think before you post it on Facebook. That’s the advice from French authorities, which have warned parents in France they could face fines of up to €45,000 (£35,000) and a year in prison for publishing intimate photos of their children on social media without permission, as part of the country’s strict privacy laws.

It’s a development that could give pause for thought for many parents used to sharing details of their children’s lives across social media. A 2015 study by internet company Nominet found parents in the UK post nearly 200 photos of their under fives online every year, meaning a child will feature in around 1,000 online photos before their fifth birthday.

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Linked to bullying and even murder, can anonymous apps like Kik ever be safe?

Questions over whether the benefits of anonymous apps – such as giving children a space to explore sensitive issues – can outweigh the risks they pose

  • Scroll to the bottom to share your stories of using anonymous apps

Nicole Madison Lovell, a 13-year-old school girl from Virginia, chatted with an 18-year-old man over anonymous messaging app Kik before he allegedly killed her in January. Since then the app – which boasts some 240 million registered users and requires no phone number or name – has been the subject of scrutiny.

In response, Kik has handed over data to the murder investigation, updated its guide for parents, and asked the Apple Store to boost its age rating from nine to 12, with company representatives stressing teens between 13 and 18 should get parental permission to install the app.

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Fred Goodwin told by judge details of his affair were in the public interest

Judge tells former chief executive of RBS he is ‘public figure’, distinguishing him from someone like Ryan Giggs Sir Fred Goodwin, the former chief executive of the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), could not have expected to keep an alleged affair with a …

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