‘Gorilla moms’: The women rescuing Congo’s endangered primates

NGOs are working with local women and rape survivors in the DRC to conserve habitat for bonobos, gorillas and chimpanzees, and care for orphaned babies

Ongoing violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has taken a heavy toll on the country’s women. Shocking levels of sexual violence have given the country a label as the “most dangerous place to be a woman”. Civil strife, along with bushmeat hunting and human encroachment, also threatens its wildlife – especially gorillas, bonobos and chimpanzees.

Bonobos have been vanishing rapidly from their only habitat – the DRC – for the past 20 years, according to the African Wildlife Foundation. Meanwhile, just 3,800 critically endangered Grauer’s gorillas remain in their DRC homeland. Chimpanzees, found in 21 African countries including the DRC, are on the IUCN Red List as endangered.

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How to stop the global inequality machine | Jason Hickel

If capitalism is going to be globalised, it makes sense to globalise the rules and standards that protect people as well

Related: Basic income isn’t just a nice idea. It’s a birthright | Jason Hickel

When the UN unveiled the new sustainable development goals two years ago, it was the one on inequality that captured everyone’s attention. Goal 10 – “reduce income inequality within and among countries” – was let in at the 11th hour after a long fight by civil society groups in the face of fierce resistance.

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‘International development’ is a loaded term. It’s time for a rethink | Jennifer Lentfer

Our organisation was formed 30 years ago to share ideas on making the poor richer. Now a new mindset has led the organisation to change its name

People would always give me a quizzical look. “And what is that, exactly?” they would ask, if brave enough to reveal their naiveté about what was to become the next decades of my life.

“Well, it’s the study of how to help poor countries become richer,” I would explain of my choice to study international development.

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Six megatrends that could alter the course of sustainable development

As the world works to achieve the sustainable development goals, a recent UN report identifies six issues that challenge ambitious targets

We are approaching two years into implementing the ambitious 2030 Agenda – a historic agreement to end poverty, combat inequalities, promote peaceful and inclusive societies, and protect the environment. The new global framework, with 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) at its core, commits to promoting development in an integrated way – economically, socially and environmentally – in all countries, ensuring that no one is left behind.

Our recently published report identifies six megatrends that will shape the trajectories of – and could potentially undermine – progress on the SDGs. In the current context of a looming retreat from multilateralism, the choices governments and societies make to manage these long-term trends will be fundamental to whether the world can get onto a pathway of sustainable development.

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Governments must keep reforming to win back voters’ trust, says OECD

Thinktank says progress has slowed and governments must push through change or face sluggish growth and inequality

Governments must push through more fundamental reforms to boost growth, cut inequality and protect workers from rapid changes in technology if they are to win back the trust of voters, the west’s leading thinktank has warned.

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development says stagnating living standards in many countries have left people disenchanted and unwilling to support more changes by their governments in areas such as jobs markets.

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Access to drinking water around the world – in five infographics

Billions of people have gained access to clean and safe drinking water since 1990, but data show that huge inequalities remain

How many people have access to clean and safe water? Where do they get it from, and how much do they pay for it? A new report by the World Health Organisation/Unicef Joint Monitoring Programme delves into data on drinking water from the last 17 years to give a detailed view of the state of access to drinking water today.

It also examines how the current situation matches up to the vision for universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water – set out by the sustainable development goals (SDGs). It considers gaps in the data and what we still need to know to achieve universal access.

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As water scarcity deepens across Latin America, political instability grows

In Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador disputes over water shortages are part of a wider fight for equal access and shared responsibility

Bolivia was shaken to its roots in the spring of 2000, when tens of thousands in the city of Cochabamba protested against the privatisation of the city’s water services. One person died and scores were injured in weeks of protest, the company was ejected and the political crisis – known as the first water war of the 21st century – was a catalyst that led to the election of Evo Morales, Bolivia’s first indigenous president.

Related: The communities of Cochabamba taking control of their own water supply

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Death-trap toilets: the hidden dangers of Mumbai’s poorest slums

Poorly-constructed toilet blocks have led to the deaths of seven people in three months, but politicians are yet to act on their promises for changeOn the morning of 4 February, Harish Tikedar, Ganesh Soni, and Mohammed Isafil Ansari waited in a queue …

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One in four UK families have less than £95 in savings, report finds

Savings gap between low- and high-income households passes £62,000 as rates of homeownership fall among the latter

The gap between rich and poor in the UK is growing, as savings and home ownership decline among the poorest families but rise among the richest, a report by insurer Aviva shows.

In a sign of growing financial strain, low-income families had just £95 of savings and investments, excluding pensions, this winter, compared with £136 in the same period last year. That figure jumps to £62,885 among high-income families, up from £50,208 a year earlier.

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Davos 2017: Oxfam attacks failing global tax avoidance battle

World Economic Forum debate hears how fight to make companies ‘pay their fair share’ is being undermined by race to cut corporation tax rates

Efforts to tackle global tax avoidance are being undermined by a “race to the bottom” on corporate tax rates led by Britain and the US, the World Economic Forum heard on Thursday.

Winnie Byanyima, the executive director of Oxfam International, told an audience at Davos that world leaders are failing to move fast enough, or far enough, to make firms pay their fair share.

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