EasyJet CEO Carolyn McCall received more than £7m last year

Carolyn McCall’s £665,000 salary, £1.15m annual bonus and £5.9m share award reflects performance and profits, says firm

The chief executive of easyJet, Carolyn McCall, was paid £7.7m last year, with more than £7m coming in bonuses.

She was paid a salary of £665,000 and an annual bonus of £1.15m for 2013-2014, with a share award worth £5.9m. The budget airline’s chief financial officer, Chris Kennedy, was paid just over £4m.

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Workers have become the prey: now a natural balance needs to be restored

Britain’s flexible labour market has denied workers the security and purchasing power necessary to keep the economy healthyIn his book Why Most Things Fail, the economist Paul Ormerod tells the story of the struggle between the arctic hare and its pred…

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John Lewis chairman’s pay goes above £1.5m for first time in 2013

Charlie Mayfield finds 9.6% rise in basic pay made up for lower bonus and is one of four directors to earn more than £1m

John Lewis Partnership chairman Charlie Mayfield saw his total pay step above £1.5m for the first time last year as a 9.6% rise in basic pay made up for a lower bonus and other benefits.

Mayfield, who has led the staff-owned department store operator which also owns Waitrose since 2007, earned a total of £1.52m, up from £1.48m a year before. He was one of four directors at the group to earn more than £1m, one more than last year even as the annual partnership bonus that is handed to all staff slid to 15% of pay from 17% a year before.

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Barclays chief Antony Jenkins defends bonus payouts in year of falling profits

Before the publication of the bank’s 2013 annual report, Jenkins stands by bonus culture as a strategy to avoid a “death spiral”

Antony Jenkins has sought to defend the bonus culture at Barclays as the bank prepares to hand him up to £1m in shares to sidestep the bonus cap.

In the wake of the furore caused by a decision to increase bonuses by 10%, following a 32% fall in profits, the Barclays boss told the Daily Telegraph he was attempting to avoid a “death spiral” after an increase in the number of staff leaving.

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Royal Mail chief Moya Greene bemoans ‘broken’ pay-setting for bosses

Ministers and the media criticised for the ‘highly politicised’ atmosphere around the issue of executive benefits

Pay-setting in government-backed companies is “hopelessly broken”, according to Royal Mail’s £1.5m-a-year chief executive, who in an unguarded email also criticised a “highly politicised” atmosphere surrounding corporate governance.

Moya Greene’s candid communication was sent to a member of the public who had voiced concern about her being offered a £250,000 housing allowance, and who shared it with the Guardian.

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Poor old Sir Martin Sorrell gets maximum payout cut from £33m to £19m | Nils Pratley

That may not sound terribly restrained – but by the standards of WPP it’s a significant concession

Poor old Sir Martin Sorrell. His famous Leap co-investment scheme is being scaled down, alongside a salary that will fall by £150,000 to £1.15m. It means the WPP chief executive’s maximum all-in jackpot in a year will no longer be £33m. If he hits all his targets, he’ll get only £19m.

What do you mean, that doesn’t sound terribly restrained? By the standards of WPP, it’s a significant concession. The board had to act, of course. It received a 59.5% rebellion against the pay report last year, the anger only inflamed by Sorrell’s plea not to fiddle with “the market mechanism”.

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How Sir Martin found out that it doesn’t always pay to advertise

The WPP boss stood up publicly to defend his salary – but, emboldened by a year of rebellions, his investors took no heed

Sir Martin Sorrell tells his high-spending advertising clients that there’s no such thing as bad publicity. But the globe-trotting boss of WPP is unlikely to have enjoyed the limelight much last week, when a 30% rise in his salary caused an investor outcry and sparked a humiliating defeat for the media company’s pay policy, in the highest-profile victory for investors during the current “shareholder spring”.

Sorrell knew the pay deal – taking his salary to £1.3m and total remuneration for 2011 to £13m – was facing rejection. But the decision to cling on to the pay rise shows the determination of the 67-year-old, who, according to an analysis by the Observer, has taken home more than £110m in the last 10 years from bonus schemes dating back as far as the early 1990s.

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Christine Lagarde, scourge of tax evaders, pays no tax

IMF boss who caused international outrage when she suggested that Greeks should pay their taxes earns a tax-free salaryChristine Lagarde, the IMF boss who caused international outrage after she suggested in an interview with the Guardian on Friday that…

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