Why you might not be warned of an online security breach

Surprisingly, under the Data Protection Act companies have no obligation to tell customers there could be a problem

A few weeks ago, I received an email from my bank saying that due to a breach of security by an online retailer my credit card was cancelled and would be reissued. I contacted the bank to ask who was responsible but it said it did not have that information. I am appalled that the retailer is not required to send me information via Mastercard as to what occurred and the steps it has taken to stop it happening again. I should be given the option to decide if I wish to do business with this company in future. LT, London

It will surprise most people that, according to the Data Protection Act, companies have no obligation to inform customers of a breach. The Information Commissioner’s Office guidelines merely state that they should “consider notifying the individuals concerned”, along with banks and authorities, to help them take precautionary steps if there’s the chance they are at risk. Service providers such as telecoms firms are the exception and must inform customers of any security concerns.

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Facebook facing German cartel probe over suspected data protection abuses

Anti-competition watchdog launches investigation into social network’s profiling of users for targeted advertising and abuse of its dominant position

Facebook is being investigated by the German federal cartel office, the Bundeskartellamt, for suspected anti-competitive behaviour stemming from breaches of data protection law.

The Bundeskartellamt said on Wednesday that it has initiated proceedings against the social network, which operates within Europe from a base in Ireland.

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Facebook and Twitter back Apple in phone encryption battle with FBI

As the US government attempts to weaken encryption, Facebook and Twitter have both come out in support of Apple. But why are tech companies so afraid?

Facebook and Twitter stepped into the battle with the FBI, with both companies pledging that they “stand with Apple” and will “aggressively fight” attempts to weaken encryption.

Apple is heading deeper in to a legal battle with the FBI, which is attempting to access encrypted information on an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino killers.

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Apple v the FBI – video explainer

Apple is facing a legal showdown with the FBI over control of its encryption code. The iPhone maker is resisting court orders to bypass security on the phone belonging to Syed Rizwan Farook, who took part in the killing of 14 people in San Bernadino last year. Apple is standing firm for now and has received support from other technology giants – but how far is its boss Tim Cook willing to go to preserve his company’s claim to user security?

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How Europe is fighting to change tech companies’ ‘wrecking ball’ ethics

As Silicon Valley firms hail the benefits of disruption, some European leaders are pushing to develop the industry’s moral compass. This is a real chance to make better decisions, fight fatalism and build a humane future

Facebook, Google, Amazon and other internet behemoths are involved in a form of technological innovation that is acting as a “wrecking ball”, the president of the European parliament declared in Brussels this week.

“The aim is not just to play with the way society is organised, but instead to demolish the existing order and build something new in its place,” said Martin Schulz. “The internet lost its innocence long ago.”

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Stolen credit card details available for £1 each online

Guardian finds batch of 100 stolen cards on sale for £98 on ‘dark web’ amid heightened fears about online security in wake of TalkTalk hack

UK credit card details are on sale for as little £1 each online, the Guardian has learned, as fears rise over the security of personal data in the wake of the TalkTalk cyber-attack.

More than 600,000 individuals had their personal details stolen from UK companies in 2014, according to the Financial Times, underlining the scale of online crime in this country. It is likely that some of that data will have ended up on a website used by criminals wanting to buy high-end UK credit card data.

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Stolen credit card details available for £1 each online

Guardian finds batch of 100 stolen cards on sale for £98 on ‘dark web’ amid heightened fears about online security in wake of TalkTalk hack

UK credit card details are on sale for as little £1 each online, the Guardian has learned, as fears rise over the security of personal data in the wake of the TalkTalk cyber-attack.

More than 600,000 individuals had their personal details stolen from UK companies in 2014, according to the Financial Times, underlining the scale of online crime in this country. It is likely that some of that data will have ended up on a website used by criminals wanting to buy high-end UK credit card data.

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TalkTalk boss says cybersecurity ‘head and shoulders’ above competitors

Dido Harding says TalkTalk will ‘thrive’ in greater transparency with customers but that it would be naive to suggest hack could not happen again

TalkTalk chief executive Dido Harding has insisted the company’s cybersecurity is “head and shoulders” better than its competitors in the wake of the massive hack attack affecting thousands of customers.

In an interview with the Guardian, Harding conceded it would be “naive” to rule out the prospect of the telecoms firm suffering a similar cyber-attack in the future, describing the threat from hackers as “the crime of our generation”.

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TalkTalk hacking crisis deepens as more details emerge

Telecoms giant receives ransom demand and reveals stolen data of up to 4 million customers may not have been encrypted

TalkTalk is facing increasing criticism after belatedly admitting it was the victim of a “significant and sustained” cyber-attack that has led to the theft of the credit card and bank details of up to 4 million customers.

The telecoms giant warned that the stolen customer data may not have been securely encrypted and that it had received a ransom demand from someone who claimed to have carried out the corporate hack.

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