Is Huawei a friend or foe in the battle for 5G dominance?

While the UK woos China’s telecoms giant, fears grow over the risks it poses to national securityIf, according to an ancient Chinese proverb, “a crisis is an opportunity riding the dangerous wind”, then Huawei is barrelling in on a storm force 12. Wher…

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Bank of England stages day of war games to combat cyber-attacks

Spate of data breaches in financial sector prompts voluntary exercise to test resilienceThe Bank of England (BoE) is staging a day-long war gaming exercise on Friday designed to test the resilience of the financial system in the event of a major cyber-…

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Cybersecurity: is the office coffee machine watching you?

Artificial intelligence and machine learning can identify threats to an organisation – but at what cost to privacy and whistleblowers?

Troubled by something deeply unethical going on at work? Or maybe you’re plotting to leak sensitive information on the company that just sacked you? Either way, you best think twice before making your next move because an all-seeing artificial intelligence might just be analysing every email you send, every file you upload, every room you scan into – even your coffee routine.

The latest wave of cyber-defence technology employs machine learning to monitor use of the ever-expanding number of smart household objects connected to the Internet of Things – shutting down hackers before they’ve broken into corporate databases or whistleblowers before they’ve forwarded on information to the media.

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Hi tech, high threat: it’s time to plan for the downsides to technology | Michael Boskin

When governments focus too much on narrow disputes like the FBI v Apple, it creates space for unexpected dangers such as cyber-attacks

What do the leaks of unflattering email from the Democratic National Committee’s hacked servers during the 2016 US presidential election campaign and the deafening hour-long emergency warning siren in Dallas, Texas, have in common? It’s the same thing that links the North Korean nuclear threat and terrorist attacks in Europe and the US: all represent the down sides of tremendously beneficial technologies – risks that increasingly demand a robust policy response.

The growing contentiousness of technology is exemplified in debates over so-called net neutrality and disputes between Apple and the FBI over unlocking suspected terrorists’ iPhones. This is hardly surprising: as technology has become increasingly consequential – affecting everything from our security (nuclear weapons and cyberwar) to our jobs (labour market disruptions from advanced software and robotics) – its impact has been good, bad, and potentially ugly.

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Yahoo confirms ‘state-sponsored’ hackers stole personal data from 500m accounts

Details including names, passwords, email addresses, phone numbers and security questions were taken from the company’s network in late 2014

Hackers stole the personal data associated with at least 500m Yahoo accounts, the Sunnyvale, California-based company confirmed today.

Details including names, passwords, email addresses, phone numbers and security questions were taken from the company’s network in late 2014 by what was believed to be a state-sponsored hacking group.

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Burglars aren’t the problem, we need to catch Russian cybercriminals

The City of London’s top policeman says every £1 spent on fighting fraud prevents around £60 of online theft

Just how defeatist are our police over online crime? The top fraud crime fighter in the country, City of London Police commissioner Ian Dyson, won’t agree with that, but he certainly talks down the possibility of arrests and convictions. There’s a bluntness to his assessment that won’t, perhaps, go down too well with the Foreign Office. Crooks in Russia and Ukraine are behind much of it, he says, and law enforcement there won’t cooperate with the British.

It’s a common saying that you can’t put a policeman on every street corner, and we certainly can’t put one on Kreschatik Street or Old Arbat. But arguably our problem is that we tried to put too many bobbies on the beat, with the vogue for neighbourhood policing skewing resources to threats, such as home burglary and car theft, that have actually been in steep decline.

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TalkTalk boss: we’re unsure how many customers affected by cyber-attack – video

Baroness Dido Harding, the chief executive of TalkTalk, confirms the company has been working to ensure all of its customers have been informed that their personal data may have been compromised following a cyber attack. Harding says that customers sho…

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